Helga Henry in conversation with…Dr Hugh Rickards

samuel-zeller-358865-unsplash (1)Photo by Samuel Zeller on Unsplash

HERE’S ANOTHER SALON STYLE EVENT FOR YOU –  I’m delighted to announce the next “In conversation with”.

The theme for our April In Conversation With… is mental health as it was in March with Nathan Dennis.  Nathan gave us lots to think about in relation to the nuanced support that we need to give young people so that they feel safe to talk about their feelings.  In particular the creation of “culturally informed and psychologically safe spaces” – and that’s more straightforward than it sounds.

As mentioned last time – it seems that this issue in particular has a higher profile than ever.  Whether it’s young royals highlighting that they have had therapy to deal with griefalarming statistics about the growth in numbers of (young people in particular) seeking medication for anxiety and depression or just a more general awareness of the need to safeguard our mental health.

We’ll be tackling the knottier issues of mental illness caused by brain damage or genetic conditions with Dr Hugh Rickards.  Hugh Rickards is programme lead for the MSc in Clinical Neuropsychiatry. He is also a consultant in neuropsychiatry at Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation NHS Trust. He studied medicine at Birmingham University and obtained MMedSci and MD degrees studying the neurochemistry of Tourette syndrome. He is the outgoing chair of the European Society for the Study of Tourette syndrome and a director of the British Neuropsychiatry Association. Dr Rickards leads a multi-disciplinary service for people with Huntingdon’s Disease (HD), HD gene-carriers and their families. This team currently provides care and advice for around 300 people.

Hugh and I went to University at the same time – his Twitter biography says “Has mental illness.  Not flippin’ “mental health issues” ffs.”  When I knew him back in the mid 80’s his illness was never mentioned or discussed.  We will consider the changing attitudes to talking about mental health, the advantages and dangers of giving something a label and the Cinderella areas of mental health care provision.  It’s going to be a fascinating discussion.

Helga Henry “In conversation with…Hugh Rickards” is on Tuesday 30th April from 6pm – 8pm at 1000 Trades Bar, Frederick Street, Birmingham,  B1 3HE, in the upstairs room. Admission is free (there’s a pay bar) but spaces are limited so please register as soon as possible.

Art and Feminism on IWD 2019

A couple of weeks ago I took part in a panel discussion entitled “Art and Feminism” – the last slot of a 2 day Graduates Unleashed event.

I’ve spoken at previous events and always admired Grace Smith – the dynamic young producer who set it up as a student.  Our paths have recently crossed again as Grace is one of the emerging producers on Imagineer’s Bridge project.  My colleague Lara Ratnaraja and I are running a development programme with them over the course of the year.

I hadn’t really met my fellow panellists before – I’d been at a networking event with Tessa from Birmingham Rep once – and it was an absolute pleasure to hear their perspectives and find out about their work.

It’s a longish watch but worth dipping into to hear about the women who have inspired us, helped us and what we hope for others working in the arts.

The March In Conversation With…tackles mental health

ian-espinosa-311604-unsplashIN CASE YOU’VE MISSED THIS SALON STYLE EVENT, I’m delighted to announce the next “In Conversation With”…  CLICK HERE TO BOOK.

I created this bi-monthly event to encourage more of a “salon culture”. And our first three events showed me that it really is possible to create a space for considered conversation and insight.  As before I’ll be interviewing people from the world of business, culture, policy and government . Rather than soundbites, we’ll converse: teasing out a topic in more depth, leaving all of us in the room challenged, enlightened and energised.

(Photo by Ian Espinosa on Unsplash)

Click here for an account of our November event, by the lovely Laura Creavan.  I delighted to say that there’s a growing number of people who are interested to find out more and who regularly attend – whatever the topic – to learn and enjoy.

The theme for this event and our next April In Conversation With… is mental health.

It seems that this issue in particular has a higher profile than ever. Whether it’s young royals highlighting that they have had therapy to deal with griefalarming statistics about the growth in numbers of (young people in particular) seeking medication for anxiety and depression or just a more general awareness of the need to safeguard our mental health. From meditation apps to adult colouring books – we’re all being encouraged to check out of the overwhelm of life from time to time. But for some people it’s more than everyday stress, it’s a debilitating and isolating illness. What can be done?

To help me explore this subject I’m delighted to welcome Nathan Dennis of First Class Legacy to share his insights. Nathan is a dynamic leader, and Award Winning Social Entrepreneur, Author and Youth & Community specialist Consultant. Using a values-based, methodology and theory of change Nathan’s work has led to real impact and produced fantastic results across a wider range of industries, some of which include the Criminal justice system, Health, Education, Arts and Construction

In particular we’ll find out more about Nathan’s work with MIND, the national charity and his pioneering work on Shifting the Dial – which aims to develop a Birmingham-based brotherhood of 300 young African Caribbean Men who feel mentally stronger and healthier. The funding for this project was granted by the Big Lottery Fund, the largest funder of community activity in the UK. Shifting the Dial is delivered by Birmingham Repertory Theatre, First Class LegacyCentre for Mental Health and Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, and has been developed in response to statistics that show that young African Caribbean men in the UK are much more likely than their white counterparts to develop serious mental illness, and three times more likely to be at risk of suicide as referenced in the Centre For Mental Health report Against The Odds (July 2017).

Please join me and Nathan for this vital (and possibly life-changing) conversation. And save the date for a second conversation on April 30th on the mind-body connection with Dr Hugh Rickards, Consultant Neuro psychiatrist. Same bat-time, same bat-venue!

Helga Henry “In conversation with…Nathan Dennis” is on Tuesday 5th March from 6pm – 8pm at 1000 Trades Bar, Frederick Street, Birmingham, B1 3HE, in the upstairs room. Admission is free (there’s a pay bar) but spaces are limited so please register as soon as possible.

Helga Henry in conversation with… Sindy Campbell

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Photo by pawel szvmanski on Unsplash

FOLLOWING THE SUCCESS OF previous conversations, I’m delighted to announce the next “In conversation with” event. CLICK HERE TO BOOK!

I created this bi-monthly event in a desire to encourage more of a “salon culture” in Birmingham.  And our first events showed me that it really is possible to create a space for considered conversation and insight.  I’ll be interviewing people from the world of business, culture, policy and government – and we’ll be in conversation about a specific theme or question of importance.  Rather than the soundbites you get in a panel discussion,  we’ll converse:  teasing out a topic in more depth.  The aim is that the conversation will leave all of us in the room challenged, enlightened and energised.

The topic this time is timely in the wake of the recent (disappointing) decision that the Channel 4 headquarters will not locate in Birmingham.  But do we need it?  Is Broadcast, essentially, so last century?   Our question is “How can Birmingham move beyond broadcast to a screen-based media city?” .  Rather than pick over the Channel 4 decision let’s look at Birmingham beyond the broadcaster and even beyond broadcast.

We’re already home to Cherry Wallis – a YouTube star with over 300K subscribers.  Birmingham City Council recently signed a deal with Netflix to significantly increase filming here.   Steven Knight, the Birmingham-born screenwriter, film director and creator of Peaky Blinders, has revealed plans to open a six-stage TV and film studio complex in the city.

And let’s not restrict our conversation to film and television – but to a wider conversation about screen based media.  Animation, games (are they still called video games?), virtual reality (VR) and story-telling on screens are still areas in which the city develop and where our talent could excel.

To help me explore this subject I’m delighted to welcome Sindy Campbell who heads up Film Birmingham – the city’s film and TV office. She’s responsible for strategic planning, developing and supporting the local industry, promoting the city as a destination for film, attracting inward

investment and the daily running of the film office. Under her management, the annual economic impact has risen, reaching a record £12.5 million. She has worked with 1000’s of production including Steve Spielberg ‘Ready Player One’, Kingsman The Golden Circle, The Girl With All The Gifts, Dancing On The Edge, Line of Duty, BBC Doctors – to name a few.  She is fiercely passionate about the growth and sustainability of the industry in Birmingham and West Midlands region.

Sindy can help us explore this question and let us know her perspective on what’s next for media in the city.  Many years ago, photographer Pete Ashton said that we have the same access to broadcast media now as Rupert Murdoch has.  It’s a slight exaggeration but – if we all have (at least in theory) a platform to share our stories  – what is the story that’s worth sharing?

Please join me and Sindy for what I know will be a lively, stimulating and future-focused conversation.

Helga Henry “In conversation with…Sindy Campbell” is on Monday 26th November from 6pm – 8pm at 1000 Trades Bar, Frederick Street, Birmingham,  B1 3HE, in the upstairs room. Admission is free (there’s a pay bar) but spaces are limited so please register as soon as possible by clicking on this link.

 

The second Helga Henry In Conversation: Anneka Deva

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Photo by Astaine Akash on Unsplash

FOLLOWING THE SUCCESS OF the inaugural event “In conversation with Anthony McCourt” in July 2018, I’m delighted to announce this second “In conversation with” event.

I created this bi-monthly event in a desire to encourage more of a “salon culture” in Birmingham. And our first event showed me that it really is possible to create a space for considered conversation and insight. I’ll be interviewing people from the world of business, culture, policy and government – and we’ll be in conversation about a specific theme or question of importance. Rather than the soundbites you get in a panel discussion, we’ll converse: teasing out a topic in more depth. The aim is that the conversation will leave all of us in the room challenged, enlightened and energised.

The topic this time is learning: not in the sense of schools or colleges or universities – but in relation to the curiosity and quest for knowledge of the citizens of Birmingham. Our question is “How can we make Birmingham a learning city?” What do we mean by that and is it a learning city already? What structures and opportunities do we need to create? What can we do to make learning attractive, even sexy?

Given the rise of “infotainment” brands like TED and the TEDx movement; with technology making all ranges of skills and capabilities available to all just by searching “How to” on YouTube, how do we promote opportunities for learning in Birmingham? How do we share and value expertise in ways that work for Brummies?

My guest for this event is Anneka Deva. Anneka is a self-confessed “curious lifelong learner. Creative mathematician. Multipotentialite.” You may know her as the woman who created TEDx Brum (She also plays an active role in the international TED community, having taken part in the TEDxSummit in Doha, TED Global in Edinburgh, and TEDx events around the world.) More recently her “passion project” has been to launch the first Enrol Yourself programme outside London. Enrol Yourself is an award winning social enterprise redesigning lifelong learning by harnessing the power of peer groups to multiply individual and collective development.

We’ll be basing our conversation around her particular interests: “the future of learning, how we create cultures in which people can flourish (in the ‘eudaimonia’ sense of the word), sharing stories that enable wider system change in education, and social change leadership development in young people.”

Please join me and Anneka for what I know will be a lively, stimulating and inspring conversation.

Helga Henry “In conversation with…Anneka Deva” is on Wednesday 26th September from 6pm – 8pm at 1000 Trades Bar, Frederick Street, Birmingham, B1 3HE, in the upstairs room. Admission is free (there’s a pay bar) but spaces are limited – 25% booked already –  so please register by clicking here as soon as possible

Just the right amount of hope

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Looking out to the future – sculpture on the Malecon, La Paz, BCS Photo: HH

Last week – on my final day of full time work actually – I happened to catch the end of a Radio 4 programme entitled “The Art of Now”.  This episode was actually about the art produced by detainees in Guantanamo Bay whilst in detention.

Artist Mansoor Adayfi concluded – “We live in hope actually:  too much hope it has an effect, because if you hope too much you’ll be devastated, you’ll get depressed.  No hope at all, people end up taking their lives.  So that’s what kept us going there.

These thoughts – in a less extreme form –  also struck me as being entirely pertinent to my setting out on a new business venture.

Hearing that quote also reminded me that inspiration is all around:  I went for a drink to celebrate my last day at work.  Our waitress (Janae) asked if we were celebrating something.  As I explained I also mentioned the danger of too much hope.  “Oh I see,” she replied, nailing the thing in just one sentence, “what you need is optimism and realism”.

It would be very easy for me to be wildly optimistic about the new business:  to have giddy daydreams of fame and fortune just dropping in my lap.   “This is going to be great – my income will double, all I need is a website and Twitter feed!”  Such thoughts are bound to disappoint in the long run – they are not grounded in reality.

On the flip side, fear can creep in:  “Who really makes a living doing this?  Surely I’d be better off finding another job.  I know this offer isn’t really paying properly but I’ll do it rather than do nothing.” And fear leads to poor decisions and actions caused by panic.

It strikes me that what is required to set about a new venture (business, hobby, sporting challenge, academic exercise) is *just the right amount* of hope:  that people make their own luck, that hard work and preparation are key to success and that there will be setbacks and failure. Optimism breeds hardiness, the ability to, as Jerome Kern song goes, “pick yourself up, dust yourself off, start all over again.”

So, it is with these twin thoughts that, like the old man in sculpture on the Malecon, I set out on my paper boat “made of a page where I wrote my dreams“.

 

 

Moving on from Birmingham Hippodrome

This post is the announcement from Birmingham Hippodrome – to find out what’s next click here and to book the In Conversation With event click here.

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New horizons – photo credit: Helga Henry

This is a recent announcement from Birmingham Hippodrome – where I’ve been working both as a consultant and then as Director of Organisational Development since 2011.

“Helga Henry has been Director of Organisational Development at Birmingham Hippodrome since 2016. Her role was created to support the cultural and organisational change called for by the Hippodrome’s new strategic plan. Her work focused on our people (Board, staff, interns and apprentices, volunteers and placements) and specifically new systems and procedures, training, development and internal communications.

Externally, she created and delivered a talent development programme (ASTONish) in Aston and Newtown, and represented the theatre at speaking and hosting engagements nationally.

At this point in the implementation of our strategic plan, the requirement is for an operational – rather than transformational – people function. The role of Director of Organisational Development will therefore cease to exist from 1 April 2018. Helga will be leaving her full-time post at Birmingham Hippodrome on 31 March, although she will continue to support us as a consultant throughout 2018.

Helga plans to launch a leadership and communication consultancy, and this will include promoting approaches from her book “NetworkAbility – Building Your Business One Relationship At A Time”. Helga will also continue her work in the creative industries as the new Chair of the Creative Advantage Fund – the UK’s first specialist VC fund for the creative industries – and as a board member of the Totally Thames Festival.

We look forward to working with Helga as a consultant and wish her every success in her new venture.”

My new consultancy – Helga Henry Ltd – will launch in May 2018.

Welcome! Plus an invitation to the launch of “In conversation with…”

Welcome to my new website and online presence.  Click here to book your place on the inaugural In Conversation with Anthony McCourt event.

Please take a look around – I am aiming to develop this site over time to respond to issues of interest in the field of communication, confidence and leadership.  If there’s anything you would like to see on this website, any topic you think I should write about or if there’s any other information you need, please contact me.

Helga Henry “In conversation with…” inaugural event

Those of you who know me, know that I am keen to encourage more of a “salon culture” in Birmingham.  And so I’ve created a quarterly event that aims to create a space for considered conversation and insight.  I’ll be interviewing people from the world of business, culture, policy and government – and we’ll be in conversation about a specific theme or question of importance.  Rather than the soundbites you get in a panel discussion,  we’ll converse:  teasing out a topic in more depth.  The aim is that the conversation will leave all of us in the room challenged, enlightened and energised.

I’m completely delighted that my first conversation will be with property wunderkind Anthony McCourt of Court Collaboration.

CEO and Founder of Court Collaboration and its group companies, Anthony has an extensive track record in complex real estate development and investment transactions, working directly with investment partners.  In 2008, Anthony joined the company behind the £100 million ‘The Cube’ development in Birmingham City Centre, which he led out of administration on behalf of Lloyds Banking Group and through to completion in 2010.  Anthony started Court Collaboration in 2010 where he is responsible for the company’s growth, vision and ultimate strategic development. Anthony spends much of his time in Asia visiting current and new clients and is proud of the inward investment record Court has into both the UK and Birmingham.

We’ll be talking about Birmingham and its development, particularly the recent .  If, as Court Collaboration’s website claims “Property isn’t about bricks and mortar, it’s about people”, who owns Birmingham now?  What does the growing infrastructure of our city mean for the people who live here?  For the people who are enticed to move here?  And for the communities that feel left behind?

Helga Henry “In conversation with…Anthony McCourt” is on Thursday 21st June from 6pm – 8pm at 1000 Trades Bar, Frederick Street, Birmingham,  B1 3HE, in the upstairs room.

Admission is free (there’s a pay bar) but spaces are limited so please register your place here.  To paraphrase the musical Hamilton – “You’ll want to be in the room where it happens“.  I look forward to welcoming you to this new initiative.

Thanks for stopping by!